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Spaying and Neutering Benefits All Pets

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Cat

Having your pet spayed or neutered directly benefits them in several ways, but it also indirectly benefits other animals. While mating is perfectly natural for dogs and cats, it can lead to unintended consequences, including:

  • An increase in the stray dog and cat populations
  • More animals living in terrible conditions
  • Overcrowding in animal shelters
  • More animals being euthanized

At Center Hill Animal Clinic, we want to help as many animals as possible. We also fully support the efforts of animal shelters in the area and know that with spaying and neutering, we can help these organizations provide better care for the animals they receive.

How Do Spaying and Neutering Help Pets Stay Healthy?

Is it really necessary to have your pet spayed or neutered? Yes. The benefits greatly outweigh any potential risks, and if we find that there might be higher risks associated with spaying/neutering your pet, we would be happy to consider other options to keep them healthy.

Both dogs and cats can experience a better quality of life after being spayed or neutered.

The benefits include:

  • Less or no risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer (females) and testicular cancer (males)
  • A reduction in hormone-related behaviors, including aggression, caterwauling (cats), roaming, spraying/marking territory, and mounting animals/furniture/etc.
  • Less risk of developing an enlarged prostate (males) and uterine infections (females)
two cute spaniel puppies retrieving a rope toy together

When Can My Pet be Spayed or Neutered?

At your pet’s very first visit, Dr. Scotchie Davis or Dr. Tim Fleming will talk to you about spaying and neutering and help you decide when to schedule their surgery. The age considered most ideal for dogs and cats is about 6 months, but large and extra-large-breed dogs need more time to grow and may need to wait until they’re 9 months to 1 year old. Overall, your pet’s exact spay/neuter date depends on their personal health and development. We’ll help you know when your pet is ready.

Request an appointment with your veterinarian or give us a call at (662) 895-8387 to discuss your pet’s needs!

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